11 February 2020

 

 

 

 “L’Étoffe des rêves de Lee Young-hee – Séoul-Paris”

 

Thanks to a donation by Lee Young-hee’s daughter, Musée Guimet has the world’s largest collection of Korean textiles outside of Korea. This exhibition is a tribute to Lee Young-hee (1936-2018), the greatest figure in Korean fashions. She worked with a specialist in the history of costume to reconstruct clothing. They used scrolls depicting ceremonies of the court from the Joseon era (1392-1910) since costumes from this period are very rare. Out of the thousand pieces donated to the museum, around 120 textiles are presented as well as several dozen accessories including hats, jewelry and hair decorations.

Everyone is familiar with the kimono but do you know what the hanbok is? I learned it is the traditional Korean costume worn by men and women, and the cut and color of the hanbok were important social markers. My eyes were drawn to the large flat knot used to fasten the short jacket, one piece of the woman’s hanbok, that looks like a half-tied bow. Since Lee Young-hee had a passion for the hanbok, she opened a boutique in Seoul in 1976 when this traditional style was losing momentum. Discover ways she made sure the hanbok was introduced worldwide and also where and when her haute couture “costumes of the wind” that became her trademark were presented. By using a variety of fabrics, styles, colors, embroidery and more, these traditional costumes have evolved into very modern fashions of today. Lee Young-hee said, “Without the past, I cannot magnify the present. It is what shows me the way…” Enjoy this wonderful visual fashion experience mais ne touchez pas!

 

 

Hints:

1. This exhibition runs through 9 March 2020. The museum is open every day except Tuesday from 10:00AM to 6:00PM.

2. Detailed information is provided in French, English and Korean on the walls in each section. Also, descriptions in French are available near many of the items on display. Take time to watch the short videos

 

Check here for more information:

15 November 2019

 

 

 

 “My Léonardo da Vinci Experiences at the Musée du Louvre”

 

It has been 500 years since the death of Léonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and the unprecedented exhibition at the Musée du Louvre is the perfect place to celebrate! Ticket sales are brisk as locals and tourists alike queue up to view the largest collection in the world of da Vinci’s paintings as well as 22 drawings. The internet is full of detailed exhibit information so there is no purpose in repeating already great writeups. Instead, my husband encouraged me to outline my experiences attending this blockbuster exhibit … hoping you may pick up a hint or two.

I bought my timed ticket (on-line only) as soon as they were available - even before the exhibition began on Oct. 24. Those of you who know me realize I like to get to museums early –before the crowds! My reservation was for 10:00. An “Amis du Louvre” is the magical museum pass that lets you avoid waiting in lines and after checking my coat I was still 30 minutes early for my reservation. My Amis du Louvre pass got me to the front of the line and I was ahead of schedule. I immediately reserved the first available time for the Mona Lisa virtual reality (VR) experience and got another timed ticket for 10:45. A credit card, an automated kiosk (which generated still another ticket), a picture ID for deposit, a short wait in line and I had my audio-guide. Then it was time for the actual exhibit which I had to break into two parts since my VR show was in the middle. The crowds were building up when I returned to finish the exhibit - but still manageable - allowing me to maneuver around quite easily and get close to the works of art. My longest wait of the day was returning the audio-guide which unfortunately was the same line for picking up the equipment initially.

Bottom line? This was a once-in-a-lifetime experience to view objets d’art by da Vinci and the master’s circle owned by the museum as well as from around the world. The infrared reflectography adjacent to some of the paintings was especially interesting. If you have the chance to attend – do it. I highly recommend the Mona Lisa VR presentation, too. You will not be disappointed!

 

 

Hints:

1. This exhibition runs through 24 February 2020. The museum is open every day except Tues. from 9:00AM to 6:00PM and Wednesdays and Fridays until 9:45PM. A reserved-timed ticket is required by all, including Amis du Louvre pass holders, to enter this exhibition. Be aware tickets may already be sold out for the date(s) you want!

2.Detailed information is provided in French and English on the walls. An audio-guide is available in both languages also. The Mona Lisa virtual reality is in several languages..

 

Check here for more information:

31 October 2019

 

 

 

 “GV Monumental – L’Art en plein air”

 

This open-air sculpture exhibition along Avenue George V is hosting monumental sculptures and photographs to attract passers-by. The Galerie Bel-Air Fine Arts has taken over the entire famous avenue for more than a kilometer and a half displaying gigantic works by four leading contemporary artists. Giant wrapped bonbons by Laurence Jenkell awaken our taste buds, hyper-realistic sculptures by Carole A. Feuerman delight the eye, paper busts of personalities ask to be identified and photographs by Charlotte Mano need to be viewed front and back. This is a perfect time to take a stroll along a chic Paris avenue, view monumental works of art and do a little window shopping along the way!

 

 

Hints:

1. This outdoor presentation runs through 14 November 2019 daily at all hours of the day and night.

2.Start at the Louis Vuitton Maison Champs-Élysées and walk toward the Seine. I zig-zagged across Avenue George V but it might be better to go down one side and then up the other. Do not miss the one on the Place Maria Callas near where the Flamme de la Liberté stands.

3.Select a picture perfect fall day with sunshine and a comfortable temperature or an evening to view the monumental works of art underneath the street lights.

 

Check here for more information:

01 August 2019

 

 

 

 “Massive Murals”

 

Street Art or Urban Art has given Paris’ 13th Arrondissement a new look especially on Rue Jeanne d’Arc and Boulevard Vincent Auriol. More than a dozen monumental “frescos” created by worldwide renowned artists can be seen in public places and are supported by public authorities. The American artist Shepherd Fairey created several of them, including one with the French motto: “Liberté, égalité, fraternité.” The neighborhood is undergoing a full transformation thanks to this colorful, varied and dynamic open-sky museum. It was difficult to choose a favorite but I loved the blue cat!

 

 

Hints:

1. Take Métro line 6 and depart at Nationale stop to begin this treasure hunt. A friend provided me with an article titled “Le boulevard du street art s’offree une fiesta” and map from a French publication. The map was essential to find the many “frescoes.” If you would like a copy, please ask and it will be emailed to you.

2.Select a picture perfect day with sunshine, blue sky, fluffy clouds and a comfortable temperature.

3.Enjoy!

 

Check here for more information:

21 July 2019

 

 

 

 “Helena Rubinstein: l’adventure de la beauté”

 

This exhibition at Musée d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaïsme recounts the life and career of the exceptional woman, Helena Rubinstein (1872-1965). We all recognize the name but do we know what an iconic woman she really was? How did this girl manage such an extraordinary journey? How did her vision of beauty accompany the emancipation of women? Being the oldest of eight children born to a modest Orthodox Jewish family in Krakow, she amazingly reinvented the culture of beauty and founded the worldwide cosmetics empire named after herself. Krakow, Vienna, Melbourne, London, Paris (in particular), New York and Tel Aviv were key places in her life and career. As a visionary and self-taught woman, she learned how to put science at the service of cosmetics starting with the creation of her first institute in Melbourne in 1902. Her initial “claim to fame” was waterproof mascara. She was the first business woman to use the press and advertising to explain a new power for women. Throughout her life Helena Rubinstein realized the importance of using herself, her beauty salons, factories, apartments, furniture, artworks, haute couture clothes and jewelry to promote her brand and create her legendary image. This avant-garde woman collected fine works of art and paintings, posed for well-known modern artists such as Dufy and Dali, and dressed in clothing by famous designers including Poirot, Balenciaga, Chanel and Dior. More than 300 items from her famous collection – objects, garments, photographs, etchings, books, paintings, sculptures and tapestries - are on display. Discover how even in death this “empress of beauty” was buried in elegance. I feel this quote by Helena Rubinstein summarizes perfectly her life philosophy: “Work has indeed been my best beauty treatment. I believe in hard work. It keeps the wrinkles out of the mind and the spirit.”

 

 

Hints:

1. This exhibition runs through 25 August 2019. The museum is open every day except Monday from 11:00AM to 6:00PM, Wednesday to 9:00PM and weekends from 10:00AM to 7:00PM.

2.Information is provided in French and English in a brochure and on the wall in each section plus by many of the items on display. Take time to watch the short video titled “4 Steps to Beauty in 5 Minutes” (1950). The steps sound familiar even today!

 

Check here for more information: